Nice Mold Heating Machine China photos

Nice Mold Heating Machine China photos

Check out these mold heating machine china images:

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: B-29 Superfortress “Enola Gay” panorama
mold heating machine china
Image by Chris Devers
Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed P-38J-10-LO Lightning :

In the P-38 Lockheed engineer Clarence "Kelly" Johnson and his team of designers created one of the most successful twin-engine fighters ever flown by any nation. From 1942 to 1945, U. S. Army Air Forces pilots flew P-38s over Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Pacific, and from the frozen Aleutian Islands to the sun-baked deserts of North Africa. Lightning pilots in the Pacific theater downed more Japanese aircraft than pilots flying any other Allied warplane.

Maj. Richard I. Bong, America’s leading fighter ace, flew this P-38J-10-LO on April 16, 1945, at Wright Field, Ohio, to evaluate an experimental method of interconnecting the movement of the throttle and propeller control levers. However, his right engine exploded in flight before he could conduct the experiment.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Company

Date:
1943

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 390 x 1170cm, 6345kg, 1580cm (12ft 9 9/16in. x 38ft 4 5/8in., 13988.2lb., 51ft 10 1/16in.)

Materials:
All-metal

Physical Description:
Twin-tail boom and twin-engine fighter; tricycle landing gear.

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Boeing B-29 Superfortress "Enola Gay":

Boeing’s B-29 Superfortress was the most sophisticated propeller-driven bomber of World War II and the first bomber to house its crew in pressurized compartments. Although designed to fight in the European theater, the B-29 found its niche on the other side of the globe. In the Pacific, B-29s delivered a variety of aerial weapons: conventional bombs, incendiary bombs, mines, and two nuclear weapons.

On August 6, 1945, this Martin-built B-29-45-MO dropped the first atomic weapon used in combat on Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later, Bockscar (on display at the U.S. Air Force Museum near Dayton, Ohio) dropped a second atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan. Enola Gay flew as the advance weather reconnaissance aircraft that day. A third B-29, The Great Artiste, flew as an observation aircraft on both missions.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Boeing Aircraft Co.
Martin Co., Omaha, Nebr.

Date:
1945

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 900 x 3020cm, 32580kg, 4300cm (29ft 6 5/16in. x 99ft 1in., 71825.9lb., 141ft 15/16in.)

Materials:
Polished overall aluminum finish

Physical Description:
Four-engine heavy bomber with semi-monoqoque fuselage and high-aspect ratio wings. Polished aluminum finish overall, standard late-World War II Army Air Forces insignia on wings and aft fuselage and serial number on vertical fin; 509th Composite Group markings painted in black; "Enola Gay" in black, block letters on lower left nose.

Plastic Mold – Excellent Finished Products that are Always Sought After

Plastic Mold – Excellent Finished Products that are Always Sought After

Plastic mold technology has been around for a relatively long amount of time and in fact it is considered to be a fun way to have fun with the family. Once a person gets to learn the nuances of the plastic mold craft he can create parts to design a toy for a little one or even create items of intrinsic value like jewellery and the like. For instance if something has broken and the product has value both sentimental as well as economic, one can buy resin from various stores that are available in varied colors and affix this on the broken plate, toy or what have you. This seems like a better choice instead of waiting for ages for a replacement or repaired item. But of course this would mean that one would have to read up on the nuances of the process and then and only then take it further, trial and error doesn’t cut it! But by learning through a specialized training method one can definitely become a sought after mould supplier!

This technology has its standing across the world, that is pretty much a given, but the China plastic molding company has a bigger part to play in the industry. Considering the innumerable moulds that possess ingenuity like crates, buckets, chairs, home appliances, cups, boxes, medical, die casting, syringe, water dripper, precision and various other objects of desire, the China plastic molding company definitely is a force to reckon with. This industry has many people trying their hand at learning the craft, but it can be achieved with careful precision only if one learns the ropes effectively. The point of today’s life is based on easy accessibility and well made plastic products are by far the best choice both in the domestic space as well as in the business industry.

A mould supplier will ensure that the equipment used in creating the finished product passes through the streamlined processes. Precision tooling equipment has to be in place to ensure that the completed produce is ready to be sold. It is extremely important that the measurements and the dimensions are factored in when making something for mass consumption. For instance, plastic finished products that are usable in a microwave oven must have a seal of ‘approval’ that entails that the finished good can be run in the oven without coming undone or leaking. A mould supplier ensures that he gets the job done with quality standards in place. If the basic standards are not met, chances are the products will be rejected. And the last thing that anyone wants after going through the processes is a reject! It has been noticed that the misuse of plastic by way of bags have brought negativity about the raw material. When plastic mold technology is underfoot, with the best manufacturer, one will have a product that meets all the global standards of quality. China has been one of the pioneers in this domain and has proven their mettle with products that are used across the globe.

Find more information on Plastic Mold, mould supplier, Plastic Molding China, Custom Moulds China at our website.Please visit here cnmould.com.

More China Plastic Tooling Design Articles

Cool China Two Shot Mold Manufacturer images

Cool China Two Shot Mold Manufacturer images

Some cool china two shot mold manufacturer images:

RA – RE – Historical Bristol Street Directory 1871
china two shot mold manufacturer
Image by brizzle born and bred
Mathews’ Bristol Street Directory 1871

Rack Hay, Back Street

Raglan Place, Stapleton Road

Railway Cottages, King Street, Bedminster

Railway Terrace, Kingsland Road

Ranger’s Court, Lamb Street

Ranson’s Court, Bragg’s Lane

Red Lane, Redcliff Meads

Redcliff Back, Redcliff Street

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/sets/72157615761…

William Baker & Sons, corn merchants www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/2060341010
Bram & Son, coopers, etc
P. Rowe, steamship agent
Harris & Sellick, rag merchants
Thomas Davis, coal merchant
Richard Cripps, wharfinger
Lucas, Brothers & Co. Redcliff wharf

Edward Mill Veal, vict, Carpenters’ Arms (pub) 1816. William Lockwood / 1820. James Warbutton / 1823 – 32. James Jones / 1834 – 39. Elizabeth Jones / 1840. Thomas Kerslake 1842 – 44. Jane Prewett / 1847. William David / 1848 to 1853. Edward Johns / 1854 to 1855. Mary Johns 1856 to 1857. Gregory Davey / 1858 to 1860. John Mallett / 1861. Eleanor Mallett / 1863 – 75. Ann Osborne / 1876 to 1878. R. E. Veal 1879. Edward Veal / 1881. James Andrews / 1882. Fanny Andrews / 1883. James Pollard / 1885 – 87. Sarah Hughes 1888. Sarah Williams / 1889. George Nott / 1891 – 99. Henry Davis / 1901. Mrs. E. Davis / 1904 – 09. Elizabeth Hinton. Edward Johns was also a fire brick maker

Redcliff Buildings, Redcliff Hill

Redcliff Crescent (east, west, & centre) York Road, Bedmister

Redcliff Hill, Redcliff Street to Bedminster Bridge

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/sets/72157615761…

1. George Gardiner, surgeon
5. John Coles, joiner
7. William Morse, surgeon & dentist
8. Henry Hart, ship surveyor and valuer
9. William John Knight, plumber & painter
10. Webb & Thomas, milliners
11. J. W. Willway & Co. dyers, Redcliff house www.flickr.com/photos/20654194@N07/2052840014
12. Charles Hanney, Co-operative Society Stores
13. John Hillier, basket maker
14. Mrs Tidcombe, earthenware dealer
29. Elizabeth Jane Harris, dyer
John Tutt, hairdresser
14. John Webb, dairyman
Mrs Bethell, dress maker
15. Cleophas Shaddick
William Prowse, carpenter
16. Robert Long, saddler, etc
17. Josiah Harris, pawnbroker
19. John McCartney, currier
20. Charles Sherwood, baker
22. Frederick Harding, pork butcher
24. William Stone, paper hanger
25. Samuel Mansfield, boot maker
26. Alfred Martin, boot maker
27. Alfred Whittle, greengrocer etc
28. William Orchard, pork butcher
29. William Henry Richards, dentist & watch-maker
30. John Mathews, butcher.
31. George Williams, grocer
32. Robert Henry Smith, potato stores
33. John Thomas Wilkins, tailor
34. James Thomas, hay dealer
36. William James Hall, grocer
37. Aldred D. Collard, butcher www.flickr.com/photos/20654194@N07/2042727109
38. Charles Harrison, confectioner
William Merrick, builder & professor of singing, Rossini villa
39. Theophilus Ackerman, druggist
6. Henry Thompson, saddler, etc
7. Mary Ann Garland, straw hat maker
8. John Peace Couch, boot maker
9. William Kirk, news-agent
11. William Frederick Sheppard, hatter
12. David J. Thomas, hosier
13. John Coates, watch maker
14. William Goulter, chemist
15. Albert Edward Flux, linen draper, etc
16. Elizabeth Jones, confectioner
17. Miss Sheppard, greengrocer
17. Robert S. Cole, plumber & gas-fitter
18. Henry Kent, butcher
19. Jacob Smith, confectioner
21. Joseph Henry Green
Redcliff Girl’s School – Mrs. Green, governess
22. Thomas Stephens, wine & spirit dealer
36. John R. Farler & Son, family grocers
37. William Heyman, oil & color-man
69. James Mantle, linen draper
71. William Clark Gobbett, linen draper
72. George Smith & Co. furnishing & lronmongers
77. James Venn & Son, tobacconists
78. Joseph Hooper, butcher
78. Farnham, Budgett & Co. tea dealers
47. Henry Charles Pope, confectioner
48. Rupert A. Weare, baker & corn merchant
49. Samuel Robert Long, spirit merchant
50. John Pitman, chemist and druggist
51. William H. Olive, pawnbroker & silversmith, etc
52. Thomas Fryer and Hallett, surgeons
53. Thomas Williams, linen draper
54. Henry Pugh & Son, family grocers

Sheldon, Bush, & Co. patent shot & lead pipe manufacturers www.flickr.com/photos/20654194@N07/2059560841

58. Samuel Seex, grocer, etc
59. Joseph Stock, linen draper
60. Edward Lucas, boot maker
61. J. H. Manning, provision dealer
62. George Powell, stationer & news-agent
63. Henry Thorne, grocer and tea dealer
64 William Edwin Jones, boot maker
64. J . & W. E. Jones, house agents
65. Joseph Willis, butcher
66. John Hayland, hatter & silver lace manufacturer
67. Baker, Houghton & Co. ironmongers
68. George Gardner, boot maker
69. F. & C. Northam, tea dealers, etc

70. Mark Sellick, vict, Boar’s Head & Redcliff Tavern (pub) On the corner with Jones’ Lane, the Boar’s Head narrowly missed demolition in 1936 when the new inner circuit road was cut through the bottom of Redcliff Hill. The pub then survived until 1941 when it was flattened by Hitler’s bombs. bristolslostpubs.eu/page149.html

57. William Turvey, vict, Ship (pub) The Ship Inn was re-built in 1860, it stood across the road from St.Mary Redcliffe Church and was next door to the famous shot tower, it once had stables and a coach house at the rear. A popular jazz venue in the 50’s and 60’s, the pub and the shot tower were demolished in 1968 to be replaced with office buildings. bristolslostpubs.eu/page168.html

70. William Rice, vict, Waggon & Horses (pub) Among the last buildings on Redcliff Hill to be demolished to make way for the new dual-carriageway in 1969. bristolslostpubs.eu/page170.html

35. John Crook, vict, Talbot Inn (pub) 1792. Lawrence Boucher / 1794. William Oldfield / 1800 – 06. Thomas James / 1816. William Sargeant / 1820 – 34. Ann Pillinger 1837 – 52. Ann Sinnett / 1853. George Sinnett / 1853. George Burgess / 1854. George Crook / 1855 to 1874. John Crook 1875 to 1877. Sarah A. Crook / 1878 to 1888. William Tudball / 1889. James Nash / 1891. William Eades / 1891 – 94. Ellen Eades 1896. Arthur Hulbert / 1897. Charles David / 1899 – 1904. Sarah Cox David / 1909. Ellen Jane Gray.

10. Mary Ann George, porter stores, vict, Albion (pub) 1871. Mary Ann George / 1872. George Cleverly / 1874 – 78. John Leakey / 1879 to 1891. Henry Peters / 1892 – 96. Dick Smith 1899 – 1901. Arthur Callaway.

6. ?. Clarke, vict, Hope & Anchor (pub) A coaching inn with stables and a large courtyard at the rear, this pub received a direct hit in the war and was burned to the ground. The site is now occupied by offices. bristolslostpubs.eu/page161.html

18. James Vincent, vict, Star (pub) Just three doors up from the Berkeley Castle, the Star is pictured here during the tenancy of Thomas Court, this is probably Mr. Court stood in the doorway. The Star ceased trading around the time of the first world war when the building was taken over by printers: The General Publishing Syndicate Ltd., who still occupied the building prior to its demolition in 1961. bristolslostpubs.eu/page245.html

21. Robert Oram, vict, Berkeley Castle (pub) The Berkeley Castle, and two doors down the hill the Lord Nelson, both these pubs disappeared in 1961 when the south east side of Redcliff Hill was cleared to make way for new flats and road widening. bristolslostpubs.eu/page147.html

23. James Potter, vict, Lord Nelson (pub) The Lord Nelson with its large Bristol United Breweries sign, and two doors to the left the Georges’ & Co. sign of the Berkeley Castle, all these buildings were demolished in the early 1960’s for road widening. bristolslostpubs.eu/page172.html

William Sage, vict, Shepherd’s Rest (pub) No.29½ Redcliff Hill (later No.113) 1867 – 68. Thomas Thomas / 1870 – 75. William Sage / 1876 – 79. Charles K. Parker / 1881 – 83. Joseph Sidaway / 1886. Mrs. Sidaway 1887. S. Hatherly / 1889. Walter Jones / 1891 – 96. Samuel Hale / 1899 – 1904. Betsy Browning / 1906 – 09. James Taylor.

35. Philip Thomas, vict, George & Dragon (pub) On the corner with Redcliff Hill. The pub was demolished in 1961 to allow for road widening as part of the second Bedminster bridge roundabout scheme. bristolslostpubs.eu/page158.html

Redcliff Brewery No.107 Redcliff Street, built in 1640, this old building like many others in the area was lost in the blitz. The brewery entrance would have been at the rear of the building on Redcliff Back where there was once a pub called the Brewers’ Arm. bristolslostpubs.eu/page248.html

Redcliff Mead Lane, Temple Gate to Cathay

Sarah Station, shopkeeper
E. Mackervoy, grocer and dairyman
Henry Saunders, greengrocer
Robert Batten, shopkeeper
Bishop & Butt, brewers, Redcliff Mead brewery

Jesse Reeves, vict, Neptune (pub) 1853. George Castle / 1861 – 63. John Bennett / 1865 – 66. Maria Bennett / 1867 to 1868. E. Ellbury / 1869 – 77. Jesse Reeves.

Richard Bush, vict, Barley Mow (pub) 1865. John Poole / 1867. J. Smith / 1868 – 89. Richard Bush / 1891 – 1904. Stephen Bush.

Redcliff Parade, Redcliff Hill

(East)

Redcliff National School (see comments below for schools in the Redcliff area).

Thomas Randall, master of schools
William Tremayne
James Knight, lodging houses
John Boon
Richard Stock, butcher
G. Symons
Daniel Taber
John Hannam, accountant
Nathaniel May
Mrs Reynolds, teacher of music
George Jackson
Mrs Prewitt
William Fry, master mariner

(West)

William Middleton Gibson
Richard & William King, African merchants
Henry Arundell Day, M.D. surgeon
Henry Brain
John C. Cummins
Donald Claxton
Robert Long
Robert William Ellis, surgeon
?. Helyer, dentist
James Logan, surgeon, M.D.
William H. Pugh
Samuel John Harris
William Hutchings

Redcliff Place, near Redcliff Hill

Redcliff Square, near Redcliff Hill

Redcliff Street, Bristol Bridge to Redcliff Hill

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/sets/72157615669…

1. T.C. Stock, paper-hangings manufacturers

2-3. E.S. and A. Robinson, wholesale Stationers, printers, etc www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/2132253987

4. Finch and Godwin, wire workers www.flickr.com/photos/20654194@N07/2052839570

5. J. Hooper, poulterer
6. H. Hooper, victualler bristolslostpubs.eu/page141.html
7-9. H. Prichard & Co. oil merchants
11. Edwin Gale, grocer
12. Thomas & Joseph Weston, iron merchants
13. Wills & Co. tobacconists www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/sets/72157603345…
13. Jacob Saunders, glass and moulding warehouse
15. Elizabeth Butterwick, stationer & music seller
16. S. & J . Newman, cabinet makers
W. Inch, japanner
17. Neat & Co. tripe merchants
17. Charles H. Chavasse, Birmingham goods warehouse
19. John Thomas, Sons & Co. wholesale grocers
20. Samuel Jacques Fear, plumber, etc
21. T. Bolwell, milliner
22. W. V. Lott, brush maker
23. George Taylor, wine & spirit merchant
21. A. & J. Warren, wholesale druggists
25. Elizabeth Bozley, grocer
27. Joseph Wacks, print seller
28. J. & S. Powell, cork cutters
29. Stiff & Fry, starch and blue makers
30. George Smith, butcher
33. T. Batson, boot maker
34-35. E. Fear, furnishing warerooms
36. ?. Thorne, cabinet maker
36. O. Ball, bellows maker
38. William Hudson, grocer
39. John Miles, earthenware dealer
40. Samuel Sweet, carpenter
Elias Wills, currier
John Jones Willie, japanner
41-42. Sanders & Ludlow, wholesale confectioners
43. William Wood, cabinet maker
49. C. R. Claridge, marine stores
51. William James Martin, boot maker
53. M. Kingston, vict. and builder
54. John Sturt, greengrocer
55. Charles Selfe Winterson, brass founder, etc
56. John Dando, furniture broker
57. Edward Fisher, outfitter
58. Robert Clarke Bartlett, milliner, etc
Thomas Williams, plumber, etc
59. Jacob Joel, boot maker
60. E. Brison & Co. brush & bellows makers, etc (Later moved to Peter Street) www.flickr.com/photos/20654194@N07/6133055828

61. H. S. Willett, spirit vaults
62. J. Derham, butcher
63. Thomas Frankham, general dealer
64. Baker, Houghton & Co. wholesale ironmongers
65. H. B. Osborne, plumber, etc
66. Richard Pullin, pork butcher
67. ?. Cowens, eating house
68. R. Dadley, cutler
69. Newton, Son, and Heanes, brass founders
71. Frederick Brice, eating house
72. S. Nelson, butcher
73. J. King & Co. wholesale confectioners
76. W. H. M’Guiness, outfitter
77. George Davidge, hair dresser
78. George Mitchell, fishmonger
80. John Slade, wheelwright
81. William A. Pedler, stay maker
82. B. Lazarus, pawnbroker
83. Mrs M. Summers, milliner
72. Thomas Lane, butcher
73. T. H. Davis, linen draper
74. T. Hasell, grocer, etc
75. G. Grant, baker, etc
76. James Mee, boot maker
77. S. J. Cross, linen draper, etc
78. J. Atkins, watch-maker
Thomas Atkins, stationer, etc
79. Boon & Son, ironmongers, etc
80. Alfred Isaac Davis, draper & milliner
81. R. & O. Warren, wholesale druggists
82. John O. Cummins, pawnbroker
83. Bees & Fear, wine & spirit merchants
84. T. Pearce, boot maker
85. M. A. Orchard, pork butcher
86. T. Dyer & Co. grocers, etc
87. William Gillard, fruiterer, etc
Nathan Parkin, printer & stationer
William Gray, glass and china dealer
88. Mrs Millard, servants’ registry
89. Billett & Co. outfitters
90. Edwards, Ringer, & Co. tobacco & snuff manufacturers. The firm of Edwards, Ringer & Bigg (Bristol) which is a combination of four old Bristol tobacco businesses, traces its origin to 1813 when William Ringer set up business in Bristol. www.flickr.com/photos/20654194@N07/2058988369

91. William Quick, bookseller
92. Edward Nott, confectioner
93. Jane Osborne, confectioner
94. R. C. Bartlett, bonnet warehouse
95. S. Holmes, boot maker
96-98. C. T. Jefferies & Sons, booksellers, printers, etc
100. W. A. Latham, currier and leather-cutter
101. J. & M. Warry, watch-makers
102. Richard Gibbs & Son, linen drapers
103. Elizabeth Clarke, confectioner
104. Harding & Co. wholesale stationers
105. J. Curtis, baker
106. John Cory Withers, hatter
107. Sykes & Co. brewers Daniel Sykes & Co. Ltd merged with Bristol United Breweries Ltd in 1897 and the brewery was closed down in 1898. For a list of south Gloucestershire pubs tied to the Redcliff Brewery in 1891 click on link www.gloucestershirepubs.co.uk/Breweries-Database-Tablevie…

108. John King, cabinet maker
110. Wills & Co. tobacco manufacturers
113. Peters and Taylor, tin-plate & galvanized ironmongers
114. Collins & Roper, druggists’ sundries dealers
115. Gerrish & Sainsbury, wharfingers ( is a term for a person who is the keeper or owner of a wharf).

116 J. & S. Gillard, rope and haircloth makers
117-120. Purnell, Webb, & Co. tobacco manufacturers & vinegar makers freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cbennett/brist…

121. E. L. Box, seedsman
122. Thomas Taylor, druggist
123. E. Moore, tallow chandler
G. & T. Spencer
124. Wansbrough & Co. wholesale stationers
125 J. B. Moore, soap & candle manufacturer
126. Isaac Davis & Son, carvers & gilders
127. J. C. Wall, railway depot
128. Edwin Jones & Co. Glasgow Iron Foundry blacksmiths.mygenwebs.com/iron-1.php
135. J. Green, cutler
136. Danks & Sanders, wharfingers & carriers, Bull wharf www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/7326771060

136. Griffith & James, slate merchants & slaters
137. Jonathan Bryant, tea merchant
138. W. Harding, fish curer
139. Aaron Diamond, tin-plate worker
140. Godwin, Warren, & Co. iron merchants www.flickr.com/photos/20654194@N07/2130787804

142. Turner, Nott & Strong, corn merchants
143. T. Fogaty, wharfinger
144. Mary Hooper, butcher
145. John Dennis, ironmonger
146. D. Harries, linen draper

26. M. Flower, vict, Queen’s Head (pub) 1752. Charles Wood / 1792 – 1806. William Williams / 1816 to 1840. Samuel Rich / 1840 to 1857. Mary Ann Rich 1858 to 1871. Marshall Flower.

37. James Pye, vict, Little Ship (pub) 1775. John Dally / 1794. Sarah Devereux / 1800. Mary Bevan / 1806 – 16. George Oliver / 1820. Thomas Siviter 1823 – 28. Sarah Siviter / 1830 – 31. James Battle / 1832. William Thomas / 1834. ? Heath / 1837. Thomas Jones 1839 – 40. Mary Robertson / 1842. William Wilcox / 1847 – 71. James Pye / 1872 – 78. Henry George James.

Sarah Gregory vict, Old Arm Chair (pub) 1863 – 74. Samuel Webb / 1874 – 77. Sarah Gregory. Samuel Webb was also a chair maker.

79. Ann Young, vict, Angel inn (pub) 1752. John Hill / 1794. Sarah Lovell / 1800 – 06. John Lovell / 1816. John Willis / 1820. Jennet Willis / 1822. Charles Parker 1823. Joseph Scott / 1825 – 32. George King / 1834 – 55. John Pearce / 1856. Edwin Pearce / 1858 – 66. John Young 1867 to 1875. Ann Young / 1876 – 77. George Wilcox / 1879 – 87. John Ehmann / 1888 to 1891. George Becker 1892 – 94. George Duggan / 1896. Lawrence Tooth / 1897. George Lethbridge / 1899. Edward Cranfield / 1901. Frederick Welsford 1904. Charles Hole / 1906. William Palmer / 1909. Frederick Wilkins. (for a glimpse see the Don Cossack).

74-75. G. C. Plumley, vict, Don Cossack (pub) On the corner with Portwall Lane. The Don restaurant by 1890 and later a temperance hotel the building was lost in the blitz. bristolslostpubs.eu/page154.html

70. T. Hill, vict, Old Fox (pub) Near the corner with Portwall Lane, the old building was pulled down in the 1870’s for road widening, and re-built in brick. bristolslostpubs.eu/page176.html

George Wilcox, vict, Golden Lion (pub) The Golden Lion was at No.100 Redcliff Street and was one of many buildings lost in this area during the blitz. bristolslostpubs.eu/page160.html

Redcross Lane, Redcross Street to Old Market Street

Redcross Street, Ellbroad Street to Redcross Lane

Mrs Caroline Butcher, dress maker
Henry Densham, tanner
George Burge, sign painter
John Eastman
Charles Augustus Dicker, broker
Henry Edward Kear, machine maker
John Dodge, marble mason
William Pinney, cabinet maker
George Morgan, poultry dealer
Matthew Crowley, garden wire worker
Samuel Collings, grocer
William Gadd, grocer
John Hazell, potatoe dealer
James Collins, marine stores
James Wheeler, grocer
E. Honour, match maker
Charles Dickson, beer seller
William Hall
Sidney Chard, chandler
British School www.flickr.com/photos/20654194@N07/10476893215
John Douglas, machinist (Douglas Motocycles of Kingswood) www.flickr.com/photos/20654194@N07/3107607134

William Turner Beavis, plasterer, vict, Rose & Crown (pub) 1775. Elizabeth Hopkins / 1792 – 94. Roger Prosser / 1806. Grace Hoare / 1816. Ann Giles / 1832. John Norris / 1847. James Haines 1849 – 54. E. Webber / 1855. James Frampter / 1857. J. H. Phippen / 1860 – 61. John W. Rippon / 1865. Elizabeth Garland 1867. George George / 1868. Samuel Collard / 1869 – 89. William Beavis / 1891. Frederick Allen / 1896. Elizabeth Williams 1901 – 04. William Stevens / 1906 – 09. George Payne / 1914. Isabella Payne / 1917 – 23. George Payne 1924 to 1934. James Henry Lines / 1934 – 38. Samuel Woodruff Hollis / 1944. Marie Merchant-Locke 1950 – 53. Margaret Merchant-Locke / 1960. G. A. J. Wills. John Rippon was a baker and beer house keeper.

Sarah Bending, vict, Hit or Miss (pub) 1861 – 67. Charles Gregory / 1868. J. Brain / 1871 – 78. Sarah Bending / 1879. Norman Richards / 1881 – 83. William Loney 1885 – 86. George Mills / 1889. Joseph Eyles / 1891. John Hobbs / 1892. Alfred Cantle / 1897 – 1901. James Harris 1904. Miss. S. Bates.

Elizabeth Ann Organ, vict, Old Crown (pub) (Back Lane) Redcross Lane. 1816 – 20. Rachael Duckham / 1823. Thomas Duckham / 1826. William Blanchard / 1828 – 32. John Thorn / 1834. John Rossiter 1837 – 61. Thomas Rossiter / 1863. James Fish / 1867 – 71. Elizabeth Ann Organ / 1872 to 1875. John Southcott 1876 to 1898. Shedrack Potter / 1901 Frederick W. Lockwood / 1902 – 04. William Symes / 1906 – 44. George Ewans 1950 – 53. Mary Ann Ewans. On 30th November 1898, Shedrack Potter sold the Old Crown and adjoining dwelling house to Stoke’s Croft brewers R. W. Miller & Co. for the sum of £2000.

Redfield Place, Lawrence Hill

Redland

Miss Frances Lisle, Redland Green house
Theodore James, Grenville house
Richard Castle, Richmond house
John Robert Turner, Luccombe house
John Llewellyn, Grove house
George Weight Gwyer, Franconia house
G. D. Whereat, Hillside house
Rev. William Cartwright, Redland parsonage
Richard Boucher James, Canowie house

(Cold Harbour Lane)

John E. Williams, vict, Cambridge Arms (pub) 1865 – 78. John Williams / 1882 – 83. William Whitmarsh / 1885 – 88. Mary Ann Rowlands / 1889 – 1909. Thomas Burridge 1914. Ellen Roberts / 1917 – 38. Cecil Geoffrey Cains Trudgen / 1944. John Harold / 1950 – 53. Harold Chapman / 1975. A. R. Wildman.

William Gregory, Union cottage
William Henry Budgett, Redland house
Edward Payson Wills, Torweston house
John Reynolds, Manor house
James Gent Wood, Stanley villa
Henry Wileman, Redland Knoll
James C. Wall, Redland lodge
Daniel Fripp, St. Vincent’s lodge
George O. Edwards, Redland court
William Balsdon
Misses Balsdon, ladies’ school, Woodfield villa
Mrs Elizabeth Williams, Elm villa
Charles Webb, builder, etc. Malvern house
Henry Robertson, Redland farm

Redland Court Road, Redland Road

Redland Green, top of Redland Road

Redland Grove, Lower Redland Road to Lover’s Walk

Thomas Davis, Santa clara
Samuel Burman, Hollybank
James Clark
Sampson Rieland
G. Frederick Church, Claverham villa
F. B. Fooks, Elmfield
Henry Webb, Elmside
Miss Thomas, Windsor villa, preparatory school
?. Townshend, York villa

Redland Hill, top of Redland Road

Miss Emma Venning
John Lucas, Redland bank
Mrs Sanderson, ladies’ boarding school, Redland hill house
Henry House, Gothic cottage
Mrs Lucy Vaughan
William Saunders, Redland cottage
Mrs Maria Humpage, Bellevue villa
Samuel Wills, Redland villa
Thomas Webster, surgeon, Malvern house
Mrs Eliza Nutting, Castle Bellevue
Abraham Champion, Castle Bellevue

Redland Parade, Redland Road

Redland Park, Whiteladies Road

William Edward Matthews, Rosedale house
Mrs Callcott, Redfield house .
Richard Sanders, Glenthern lodge
William Cromey, Camborne house
George Thomas Bright, Rougemont house
James Rowe Shorland, Greinton house

Redland Park Road, 151, Whiteladies Road

Redland Park Villas, Whiteladies Road

Mrs Agnes Young, ladies boarding school
Col. Charles Hutchinson
John Bourne
Henry William Sayles
John Piggott
Thomas Garner Grundy
John Edwards, Runnymede house
William Thomas Moseley, Thornbury house
Edward Strickland
T. Phillips, Stanley house
Richard Ferris Rumsey, Bradley house
Thomas Bush Sage, Brighton house
Miss Hooft, Stanley house
Miss Elizabeth Irons, ladies’ boarding school, Camerton villa
D. Cunliffe, Cromer villa
Col. Patton, Sandown villa
Owen Smith
George Palmer Hutchins, Henley villa
George Thomas, Dartmouth villa
?. Kingswood lodge
Rev. Henry Marris, Lyndhurst villa
Redland Park Congregational Church

Redland Road, Redland to Cheltenham Road

Redland Road (Lower), Redland Road to Whiteladies Road

John Mustey, greengrocer
George M. Stansfeld, surgeon, The Shrubbery
George Webber, Elm lodge
Mrs Margret Williams, Somerset house
Mrs Isabella Stewart, Eldon villa
Charles Bennett, Wellington villa
John York, Warkwood house
John G. Thornton, Avenue villa
Mrs Elizabeth Hoskin, Ross villa
Henry Ashman, Belgravia
J . Bryant. Chelvey villa
William Bevan Warry, Chisbury villa
William Blackwell, Rozel villa
Henry Gillard, Avonleigh villa
Col. Charles Waddell, Orchard villa
Joseph Hartland, Tewkesbury villa
James Willey, 2, Collumpton villas
H. H. Hodge, 1, Collumpton villas
John Davis, builder, grocer etc. Vale house
J . Peters, butcher
William Mustey, greengrocer

(Bindon Place)

1. David Pickett
2. Samuel Hayter, dentist
3. Mrs Mary Morgan, lodging house
4. Joseph Goss
5. Mrs Annie Tedder

Redland Side, Cheltenham Road

Redland Terrace, Lower Redland Road, near Whiteladies Road

1. Rev. John Howard Hinton, M.A.
3. William James
4. Alfred Robert S. Hiley
5. Mrs Agnes Phillips
6. Henry William Britton
7. James Shaw

Redland Vale, Redland Road

Mrs Fowell and C. Watts, Albion villa
Mrs Catherine M. Rudge
Charles K. Rudge, surgeon
Thomas Walters, St. James’s villa
Thomas Griffin
Robert David Douch Bartlett, Clifft villa
Mrs Susan Westley, Shirley villa
John Cox, Hillside lodge
Mrs Evans, Eva cottage
Gustavus Richard Lovell, Swiss cottage
William Ball Palmer, Alma cottage
George Davis, Clyde cottage
E. Goodwin, Fairbank villa .

(Sunnybank)

Mrs John Lane, Cradley house
Miss Pinchback, Sidney villa
George Muschamp
Edward Walton Claypole, Pendennis villa
Joseph Lockey, Raymont villa
Mrs Mary Randall, Donnington villa
Edward Maish
Alfred Hall, Erne Leat

Red Lodge Court, Frogmore Cliff, Park Row

Redlodge Place, Leopard Lane

Red Rank, Lower Ashley Road

Reece’s Court, 65, Hotwell Road

Reeds Court, East Street, Bedminster

Reform Court, Old Market Street

Regent Buildings, Bishop Street to Sargent St, Bedminster

Regent Place, St. James’ Square

Regent Place, Union Road, Dings

Regent Place, Royal York Crescent

Regent Place, Spring Street

Regent Road, Coronation Road, to Bedminster Parade

(Nelson Gardens)

William Davis, grocer
James Atkins
Richard F. Cox, clerk
Frederick Shortman, shopkeeper
William Jones, grocer

Daniel Hill, vict, Little Ship (pub) 1854 – 71. Daniel Hill / 1874 – 77. Stephen Hitchcock / 1879. Thomas Elbury / 1881 – 83. Ann Cook / 1885 – 87. Leonard Organ 1888 – 1909. Frederick George Aplin / 1914. Ellen Evans.

Thomas Knight, vict, White Squall (pub) 1867 – 91. Thomas Knight / 1893 – 99. Thomas Nicholls / 1904 – 14. John Porter / 1917 – 21. Herman Gallop.

William Knight, vict, Coronation inn (pub) 1831 – 34. Martha Yeates / 1837 – 44. John Yeates / 1849 – 52. John Parkes / 1853 – 54. Henry Chaffey / 1856 – 61. William Harrill 1863. Maria Harrill / 1867 – 69. William Marshall / 1871. William Knight / 1872 to 1877. William Selway / 1878. H. Kiddle 1879. Joseph Roberts / 1882 – 83. William Davis / 1886 – 87. Arthur Bishop / 1888 – 89. William E. Davis / 1891 – 96. James Hall 1897 – 99. Charles Pegler / 1901. Charles Lloyd / 1904. H. Hodge / 1906 – 28. William Sweetland / 1931. Frederick Burchill 1935. George Brown / 1937 – 38. Elsie Holley / 1944 – 50. Clara Batten / 1953. Alan Crane.

Thomas Hill, vict, Robin Hood (pub) Queen Street. 1858 – 75. Thomas Hill / 1882 – 85. Jane Bass / 1886 to 1887. G. Mills / 1888. Betsey Mills / 1889 to 1891. Betsey Gully 1892. Thomas Veal / 1896 – 99. Elizabeth Veal / 1901. W. Wright / 1906. Thomas Plumb / 1909. William Pudner 1914. William Chamberlain / 1917. Rosa Annie Saunders / 1921. Emma Griffey / 1925 – 28. Matilda Jane Ashley.

Regent Street, Boyce’s Buildings to Clifton

Regent Street, Clarence Town, St. Philips

Sarah A. Doust, beer retailer
John Spurrier, fly & break proprietor
Mary Orchard, butcher
Joseph C. Paul
Gustaff Selund
James Anford
Osmond Williams
John Yalland
Thomas Williams
Mary Dustan
Thomas D. Jarrett, tax collector
William Fox
Thomas James

Caleb Lee, beer retailer vict, Newtown Tavern (pub) 1867 – 89. Caleb Lee / 1891 – 96. William Evans / 1899 – 1904. Edwin Lentell / 1906 – 09. Richard Parker / 1914 – 28. John Leaman 1931. Frank Saunders / 1935 – 38. Gilbert England / 1944 – 53. Frederick Pegler.

Elizabeth Tinsley, vict vict, Freemason’s Arms Hotel (pub) Regent Street / Barrow Road (the Freemasons’ Arms was demolished in 1969) 1863. George Kinnerley / 1871 – 76. Elizabeth Tinsley / 1877. William Harding / 1878 – 79. Isaac Jefferies / 1885. William Higgs 1886 – 87. L. Morgan / 1889 – 91. William Baggs / 1892. Edward Roberts / 1894. Walter Whyatt / 1899. William Brown 1904 – 06. James Davis / 1909. William Withers / 1914 – 17. Frederick Curtis / 1921. Frank Ford / 1925. Edwin Tanner 1928 – 38. Clara Tanner / 1944 – 49. Henry Burt / 1949 to 1957. Reginald Gwinnell.

Regent Terrace, Newtown

Regent Terrace, St. James’ Square

Regina Place, Stapleton Road

Rennison’s Baths, bottom of Cheltenham Buildings, Montpelier

Rennison’s Court, Hillgrove Hill

Reynard’s Court, The Horsefair

RI – RY – Bristol Street Directory 1871

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Lockheed P-38J-10-LO Lightning
injection mold china
Image by Chris Devers
See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed P-38J-10-LO Lightning

In the P-38 Lockheed engineer Clarence "Kelly" Johnson and his team of designers created one of the most successful twin-engine fighters ever flown by any nation. From 1942 to 1945, U. S. Army Air Forces pilots flew P-38s over Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Pacific, and from the frozen Aleutian Islands to the sun-baked deserts of North Africa. Lightning pilots in the Pacific theater downed more Japanese aircraft than pilots flying any other Allied warplane.

Maj. Richard I. Bong, America’s leading fighter ace, flew this P-38J-10-LO on April 16, 1945, at Wright Field, Ohio, to evaluate an experimental method of interconnecting the movement of the throttle and propeller control levers. However, his right engine exploded in flight before he could conduct the experiment.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Company

Date:
1943

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 390 x 1170cm, 6345kg, 1580cm (12ft 9 9/16in. x 38ft 4 5/8in., 13988.2lb., 51ft 10 1/16in.)

Materials:
All-metal

Physical Description:
Twin-tail boom and twin-engine fighter; tricycle landing gear.

Long Description:
From 1942 to 1945, the thunder of P-38 Lightnings was heard around the world. U. S. Army pilots flew the P-38 over Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Pacific; from the frozen Aleutian Islands to the sun-baked deserts of North Africa. Measured by success in combat, Lockheed engineer Clarence "Kelly" Johnson and a team of designers created the most successful twin-engine fighter ever flown by any nation. In the Pacific Theater, Lightning pilots downed more Japanese aircraft than pilots flying any other Army Air Forces warplane.

Johnson and his team conceived this twin-engine, single-pilot fighter airplane in 1936 and the Army Air Corps authorized the firm to build it in June 1937. Lockheed finished constructing the prototype XP-38 and delivered it to the Air Corps on New Year’s Day, 1939. Air Corps test pilot and P-38 project officer, Lt. Benjamin S. Kelsey, first flew the aircraft on January 27. Losing this prototype in a crash at Mitchel Field, New York, with Kelsey at the controls, did not deter the Air Corps from ordering 13 YP-38s for service testing on April 27. Kelsey survived the crash and remained an important part of the Lightning program. Before the airplane could be declared ready for combat, Lockheed had to block the effects of high-speed aerodynamic compressibility and tail buffeting, and solve other problems discovered during the service tests.

The most vexing difficulty was the loss of control in a dive caused by aerodynamic compressibility. During late spring 1941, Air Corps Major Signa A. Gilke encountered serious trouble while diving his Lightning at high-speed from an altitude of 9,120 m (30,000 ft). When he reached an indicated airspeed of about 515 kph (320 mph), the airplane’s tail began to shake violently and the nose dropped until the dive was almost vertical. Signa recovered and landed safely and the tail buffet problem was soon resolved after Lockheed installed new fillets to improve airflow where the cockpit gondola joined the wing center section. Seventeen months passed before engineers began to determine what caused the Lightning’s nose to drop. They tested a scale model P-38 in the Ames Laboratory wind tunnel operated by the NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics) and found that shock waves formed when airflow over the wing leading edges reached transonic speeds. The nose drop and loss of control was never fully remedied but Lockheed installed dive recovery flaps under each wing in 1944. These devices slowed the P-38 enough to allow the pilot to maintain control when diving at high-speed.

Just as the development of the North American P-51 Mustang, Republic P-47 Thunderbolt, and the Vought F4U Corsair (see NASM collection for these aircraft) pushed the limits of aircraft performance into unexplored territory, so too did P-38 development. The type of aircraft envisioned by the Lockheed design team and Air Corps strategists in 1937 did not appear until June 1944. This protracted shakedown period mirrors the tribulations suffered by Vought in sorting out the many technical problems that kept F4U Corsairs off U. S. Navy carrier decks until the end of 1944.

Lockheed’s efforts to trouble-shoot various problems with the design also delayed high-rate, mass production. When Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, the company had delivered only 69 Lightnings to the Army. Production steadily increased and at its peak in 1944, 22 sub-contractors built various Lightning components and shipped them to Burbank, California, for final assembly. Consolidated-Vultee (Convair) subcontracted to build the wing center section and the firm later became prime manufacturer for 2,000 P-38Ls but that company’s Nashville plant completed only 113 examples of this Lightning model before war’s end. Lockheed and Convair finished 10,038 P-38 aircraft including 500 photo-reconnaissance models. They built more L models, 3,923, than any other version.

To ease control and improve stability, particularly at low speeds, Lockheed equipped all Lightnings, except a batch ordered by Britain, with propellers that counter-rotated. The propeller to the pilot’s left turned counter-clockwise and the propeller to his right turned clockwise, so that one propeller countered the torque and airflow effects generated by the other. The airplane also performed well at high speeds and the definitive P-38L model could make better than 676 kph (420 mph) between 7,600 and 9,120 m (25,000 and 30,000 ft). The design was versatile enough to carry various combinations of bombs, air-to-ground rockets, and external fuel tanks. The multi-engine configuration reduced the Lightning loss-rate to anti-aircraft gunfire during ground attack missions. Single-engine airplanes equipped with power plants cooled by pressurized liquid, such as the North American P-51 Mustang (see NASM collection), were particularly vulnerable. Even a small nick in one coolant line could cause the engine to seize in a matter of minutes.

The first P-38s to reach the Pacific combat theater arrived on April 4, 1942, when a version of the Lightning that carried reconnaissance cameras (designated the F-4), joined the 8th Photographic Squadron based in Australia. This unit launched the first P-38 combat missions over New Guinea and New Britain during April. By May 29, the first 25 P-38s had arrived in Anchorage, Alaska. On August 9, pilots of the 343rd Fighter Group, Eleventh Air Force, flying the P-38E, shot down a pair of Japanese flying boats.

Back in the United States, Army Air Forces leaders tried to control a rumor that Lightnings killed their own pilots. On August 10, 1942, Col. Arthur I. Ennis, Chief of U. S. Army Air Forces Public Relations in Washington, told a fellow officer "… Here’s what the 4th Fighter [training] Command is up against… common rumor out there that the whole West Coast was filled with headless bodies of men who jumped out of P-38s and had their heads cut off by the propellers." Novice Lightning pilots unfamiliar with the correct bailout procedures actually had more to fear from the twin-boom tail, if an emergency dictated taking to the parachute but properly executed, Lightning bailouts were as safe as parachuting from any other high-performance fighter of the day. Misinformation and wild speculation about many new aircraft was rampant during the early War period.

Along with U. S. Navy Grumman F4F Wildcats (see NASM collection) and Curtiss P-40 Warhawks (see NASM collection), Lightnings were the first American fighter airplanes capable of consistently defeating Japanese fighter aircraft. On November 18, men of the 339th Fighter Squadron became the first Lightning pilots to attack Japanese fighters. Flying from Henderson Field on Guadalcanal, they claimed three during a mission to escort Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers (see NASM collection).

On April 18, 1943, fourteen P-38 pilots from the 70th and the 339th Fighter Squadrons, 347th Fighter Group, accomplished one of the most important Lightning missions of the war. American ULTRA cryptanalysts had decoded Japanese messages that revealed the timetable for a visit to the front by the commander of the Imperial Japanese Navy, Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto. This charismatic leader had crafted the plan to attack Pearl Harbor and Allied strategists believed his loss would severely cripple Japanese morale. The P-38 pilots flew 700 km (435 miles) at heights from 3-15 m (10-50 feet) above the ocean to avoid detection. Over the coast of Bougainville, they intercepted a formation of two Mitsubishi G4M BETTY bombers (see NASM collection) carrying the Admiral and his staff, and six Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighters (see NASM collection) providing escort. The Lightning pilots downed both bombers but lost Lt. Ray Hine to a Zero.

In Europe, the first Americans to down a Luftwaffe aircraft were Lt. Elza E. Shahan flying a 27th Fighter Squadron P-38E, and Lt. J. K. Shaffer flying a Curtiss P-40 (see NASM collection) in the 33rd Fighter Squadron. The two flyers shared the destruction of a Focke-Wulf Fw 200C-3 Condor maritime strike aircraft over Iceland on August 14, 1942. Later that month, the 1st fighter group accepted Lightnings and began combat operations from bases in England but this unit soon moved to fight in North Africa. More than a year passed before the P-38 reappeared over Western Europe. While the Lightning was absent, U. S. Army Air Forces strategists had relearned a painful lesson: unescorted bombers cannot operate successfully in the face of determined opposition from enemy fighters. When P-38s returned to England, the primary mission had become long-range bomber escort at ranges of about 805 kms (500 miles) and at altitudes above 6,080 m (20,000 ft).

On October 15, 1943, P-38H pilots in the 55th Fighter Group flew their first combat mission over Europe at a time when the need for long-range escorts was acute. Just the day before, German fighter pilots had destroyed 60 of 291 Eighth Air Force B-17 Flying Fortresses (see NASM collection) during a mission to bomb five ball-bearing plants at Schweinfurt, Germany. No air force could sustain a loss-rate of nearly 20 percent for more than a few missions but these targets lay well beyond the range of available escort fighters (Republic P-47 Thunderbolt, see NASM collection). American war planners hoped the long-range capabilities of the P-38 Lightning could halt this deadly trend, but the very high and very cold environment peculiar to the European air war caused severe power plant and cockpit heating difficulties for the Lightning pilots. The long-range escort problem was not completely solved until the North American P-51 Mustang (see NASM collection) began to arrive in large numbers early in 1944.

Poor cockpit heating in the H and J model Lightnings made flying and fighting at altitudes that frequently approached 12,320 m (40,000 ft) nearly impossible. This was a fundamental design flaw that Kelly Johnson and his team never anticipated when they designed the airplane six years earlier. In his seminal work on the Allison V-1710 engine, Daniel Whitney analyzed in detail other factors that made the P-38 a disappointing airplane in combat over Western Europe.

• Many new and inexperienced pilots arrived in England during December 1943, along with the new J model P-38 Lightning.

• J model rated at 1,600 horsepower vs. 1,425 for earlier H model Lightnings. This power setting required better maintenance between flights. It appears this work was not done in many cases.

• During stateside training, Lightning pilots were taught to fly at high rpm settings and low engine manifold pressure during cruise flight. This was very hard on the engines, and not in keeping with technical directives issued by Allison and Lockheed.

• The quality of fuel in England may have been poor, TEL (tetraethyl lead) fuel additive appeared to condense inside engine induction manifolds, causing detonation (destructive explosion of fuel mixture rather than controlled burning).

• Improved turbo supercharger intercoolers appeared on the J model P-38. These devices greatly reduced manifold temperatures but this encouraged TEL condensation in manifolds during cruise flight and increased spark plug fouling.

Using water injection to minimize detonation might have reduced these engine problems. Both the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt and the North American P-51 Mustang (see NASM collection) were fitted with water injection systems but not the P-38. Lightning pilots continued to fly, despite these handicaps.

During November 1942, two all-Lightning fighter groups, the 1st and the 14th, began operating in North Africa. In the Mediterranean Theater, P-38 pilots flew more sorties than Allied pilots flying any other type of fighter. They claimed 608 enemy a/c destroyed in the air, 123 probably destroyed and 343 damaged, against the loss of 131 Lightnings.

In the war against Japan, the P-38 truly excelled. Combat rarely occurred above 6,080 m (20,000 ft) and the engine and cockpit comfort problems common in Europe never plagued pilots in the Pacific Theater. The Lightning’s excellent range was used to full advantage above the vast expanses of water. In early 1945, Lightning pilots of the 12th Fighter Squadron, 18th Fighter Group, flew a mission that lasted 10 ½ hours and covered more than 3,220 km (2,000 miles). In August, P-38 pilots established the world’s long-distance record for a World War II combat fighter when they flew from the Philippines to the Netherlands East Indies, a distance of 3,703 km (2,300 miles). During early 1944, Lightning pilots in the 475th Fighter Group began the ‘race of aces.’ By March, Lieutenant Colonel Thomas J. Lynch had scored 21 victories before he fell to antiaircraft gunfire while strafing enemy ships. Major Thomas B. McGuire downed 38 Japanese aircraft before he was killed when his P-38 crashed at low altitude in early January 1945. Major Richard I. Bong became America’s highest scoring fighter ace (40 victories) but died in the crash of a Lockheed P-80 (see NASM collection) on August 6, 1945.

Museum records show that Lockheed assigned the construction number 422-2273 to the National Air and Space Museum’s P-38. The Army Air Forces accepted this Lightning as a P-38J-l0-LO on November 6, 1943, and the service identified the airplane with the serial number 42-67762. Recent investigations conducted by a team of specialists at the Paul E. Garber Facility, and Herb Brownstein, a volunteer in the Aeronautics Division at the National Air and Space Museum, have revealed many hitherto unknown aspects to the history of this aircraft.

Brownstein examined NASM files and documents at the National Archives. He discovered that a few days after the Army Air Forces (AAF) accepted this airplane, the Engineering Division at Wright Field in Dayton, Ohio, granted Lockheed permission to convert this P-38 into a two-seat trainer. The firm added a seat behind the pilot to accommodate an instructor who would train civilian pilots in instrument flying techniques. Once trained, these test pilots evaluated new Lightnings fresh off the assembly line.

In a teletype sent by the Engineering Division on March 2, 1944, Brownstein also discovered that this P-38 was released to Colonel Benjamin S. Kelsey from March 3 to April 10, 1944, to conduct special tests. This action was confirmed the following day in a cable from the War Department. This same pilot, then a Lieutenant, flew the XP-38 across the United States in 1939 and survived the crash that destroyed this Lightning at Mitchel Field, New York. In early 1944, Kelsey was assigned to the Eighth Air Force in England and he apparently traveled to the Lockheed factory at Burbank to pick up the P-38. Further information about these tests and Kelsey’s involvement remain an intriguing question.

One of Brownstein’s most important discoveries was a small file rich with information about the NASM Lightning. This file contained a cryptic reference to a "Major Bong" who flew the NASM P-38 on April 16, 1945, at Wright Field. Bong had planned to fly for an hour to evaluate an experimental method of interconnecting the movement of the throttle and propeller control levers. His flight ended after twenty-minutes when "the right engine blew up before I had a chance [to conduct the test]." The curator at the Richard I. Bong Heritage Center confirmed that America’s highest scoring ace made this flight in the NASM P-38 Lightning.

Working in Building 10 at the Paul E. Garber Facility, Rob Mawhinney, Dave Wilson, Wil Lee, Bob Weihrauch, Jim Purton, and Heather Hutton spent several months during the spring and summer of 2001 carefully disassembling, inspecting, and cleaning the NASM Lightning. They found every hardware modification consistent with a model J-25 airplane, not the model J-10 painted in the data block beneath the artifact’s left nose. This fact dovetails perfectly with knowledge uncovered by Brownstein. On April 10, the Engineering Division again cabled Lockheed asking the company to prepare 42-67762 for transfer to Wright Field "in standard configuration." The standard P-38 configuration at that time was the P-38J-25. The work took several weeks and the fighter does not appear on Wright Field records until May 15, 1944. On June 9, the Flight Test Section at Wright Field released the fighter for flight trials aimed at collecting pilot comments on how the airplane handled.

Wright Field’s Aeromedical Laboratory was the next organization involved with this P-38. That unit installed a kit on July 26 that probably measured the force required to move the control wheel left and right to actuate the power-boosted ailerons installed in all Lightnings beginning with version J-25. From August 12-16, the Power Plant Laboratory carried out tests to measure the hydraulic pump temperatures on this Lightning. Then beginning September 16 and lasting about ten days, the Bombing Branch, Armament Laboratory, tested type R-3 fragmentation bomb racks. The work appears to have ended early in December. On June 20, 1945, the AAF Aircraft Distribution Office asked that the Air Technical Service Command transfer the Lightning from Wright Field to Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma, a temporary holding area for Air Force museum aircraft. The P-38 arrived at the Oklahoma City Air Depot on June 27, 1945, and mechanics prepared the fighter for flyable storage.

Airplane Flight Reports for this Lightning also describe the following activities and movements:

6-21-45 Wright Field, Ohio, 5.15 hours of flying.
6-22-45Wright Field, Ohio, .35 minutes of flying by Lt. Col. Wendel [?] J. Kelley and P. Shannon.
6-25-45Altus, Oklahoma, .55 hours flown, pilot P. Shannon.
6-27-45Altus, Oklahoma, #2 engine changed, 1.05 hours flown by Air Corps F/O Ralph F. Coady.
10-5-45 OCATSC-GCAAF (Garden City Army Air Field, Garden City, Kansas), guns removed and ballast added.
10-8-45Adams Field, Little Rock, Arkansas.
10-9-45Nashville, Tennessee,
5-28-46Freeman Field, Indiana, maintenance check by Air Corps Capt. H. M. Chadhowere [sp]?
7-24-46Freeman Field, Indiana, 1 hour local flight by 1st Lt. Charles C. Heckel.
7-31-46 Freeman Field, Indiana, 4120th AAF Base Unit, ferry flight to Orchard Place [Illinois] by 1st Lt. Charles C. Heckel.

On August 5, 1946, the AAF moved the aircraft to another storage site at the former Consolidated B-24 bomber assembly plant at Park Ridge, Illinois. A short time later, the AAF transferred custody of the Lightning and more than sixty other World War II-era airplanes to the Smithsonian National Air Museum. During the early 1950s, the Air Force moved these airplanes from Park Ridge to the Smithsonian storage site at Suitland, Maryland.

• • •

Quoting from Wikipedia | Lockheed P-38 Lightning:

The Lockheed P-38 Lightning was a World War II American fighter aircraft built by Lockheed. Developed to a United States Army Air Corps requirement, the P-38 had distinctive twin booms and a single, central nacelle containing the cockpit and armament. Named "fork-tailed devil" by the Luftwaffe and "two planes, one pilot" by the Japanese, the P-38 was used in a number of roles, including dive bombing, level bombing, ground-attack, photo reconnaissance missions, and extensively as a long-range escort fighter when equipped with drop tanks under its wings.

The P-38 was used most successfully in the Pacific Theater of Operations and the China-Burma-India Theater of Operations as the mount of America’s top aces, Richard Bong (40 victories) and Thomas McGuire (38 victories). In the South West Pacific theater, the P-38 was the primary long-range fighter of United States Army Air Forces until the appearance of large numbers of P-51D Mustangs toward the end of the war. The P-38 was unusually quiet for a fighter, the exhaust muffled by the turbo-superchargers. It was extremely forgiving, and could be mishandled in many ways, but the rate of roll was too slow for it to excel as a dogfighter. The P-38 was the only American fighter aircraft in production throughout American involvement in the war, from Pearl Harbor to Victory over Japan Day.

Variants: Lightning in maturity: P-38J

The P-38J was introduced in August 1943. The turbo-supercharger intercooler system on previous variants had been housed in the leading edges of the wings and had proven vulnerable to combat damage and could burst if the wrong series of controls were mistakenly activated. In the P-38J model, the streamlined engine nacelles of previous Lightnings were changed to fit the intercooler radiator between the oil coolers, forming a "chin" that visually distinguished the J model from its predecessors. While the P-38J used the same V-1710-89/91 engines as the H model, the new core-type intercooler more efficiently lowered intake manifold temperatures and permitted a substantial increase in rated power. The leading edge of the outer wing was fitted with 55 gal (208 l) fuel tanks, filling the space formerly occupied by intercooler tunnels, but these were omitted on early P-38J blocks due to limited availability.

The final 210 J models, designated P-38J-25-LO, alleviated the compressibility problem through the addition of a set of electrically-actuated dive recovery flaps just outboard of the engines on the bottom centerline of the wings. With these improvements, a USAAF pilot reported a dive speed of almost 600 mph (970 km/h), although the indicated air speed was later corrected for compressibility error, and the actual dive speed was lower. Lockheed manufactured over 200 retrofit modification kits to be installed on P-38J-10-LO and J-20-LO already in Europe, but the USAAF C-54 carrying them was shot down by an RAF pilot who mistook the Douglas transport for a German Focke-Wulf Condor. Unfortunately the loss of the kits came during Lockheed test pilot Tony LeVier‘s four-month morale-boosting tour of P-38 bases. Flying a new Lightning named "Snafuperman" modified to full P-38J-25-LO specs at Lockheed’s modification center near Belfast, LeVier captured the pilots’ full attention by routinely performing maneuvers during March 1944 that common Eighth Air Force wisdom held to be suicidal. It proved too little too late because the decision had already been made to re-equip with Mustangs.

The P-38J-25-LO production block also introduced hydraulically-boosted ailerons, one of the first times such a system was fitted to a fighter. This significantly improved the Lightning’s rate of roll and reduced control forces for the pilot. This production block and the following P-38L model are considered the definitive Lightnings, and Lockheed ramped up production, working with subcontractors across the country to produce hundreds of Lightnings each month.

Noted P-38 pilots

Richard Bong and Thomas McGuire

The American ace of aces and his closest competitor both flew Lightnings as they tallied 40 and 38 victories respectively. Majors Richard I. "Dick" Bong and Thomas J. "Tommy" McGuire of the USAAF competed for the top position. Both men were awarded the Medal of Honor.

McGuire was killed in air combat in January 1945 over the Philippines, after racking up 38 confirmed kills, making him the second-ranking American ace. Bong was rotated back to the United States as America’s ace of aces, after making 40 kills, becoming a test pilot. He was killed on 6 August 1945, the day the atomic bomb was dropped on Japan, when his P-80 Shooting Star jet fighter flamed out on takeoff.

Charles Lindbergh

The famed aviator Charles Lindbergh toured the South Pacific as a civilian contractor for United Aircraft Corporation, comparing and evaluating performance of single- and twin-engined fighters for Vought. He worked to improve range and load limits of the F4U Corsair, flying both routine and combat strafing missions in Corsairs alongside Marine pilots. In Hollandia, he attached himself to the 475th FG flying P-38s so that he could investigate the twin-engine fighter. Though new to the machine, he was instrumental in extending the range of the P-38 through improved throttle settings, or engine-leaning techniques, notably by reducing engine speed to 1,600 rpm, setting the carburetors for auto-lean and flying at 185 mph (298 km/h) indicated airspeed which reduced fuel consumption to 70 gal/h, about 2.6 mpg. This combination of settings had been considered dangerous; it was thought it would upset the fuel mixture and cause an explosion. Everywhere Lindbergh went in the South Pacific, he was accorded the normal preferential treatment of a visiting colonel, though he had resigned his Air Corps Reserve colonel’s commission three years before. While with the 475th, he held training classes and took part in a number of Army Air Corps combat missions. On 28 July 1944, Lindbergh shot down a Mitsubishi Ki-51 "Sonia" flown expertly by the veteran commander of 73rd Independent Flying Chutai, Imperial Japanese Army Captain Saburo Shimada. In an extended, twisting dogfight in which many of the participants ran out of ammunition, Shimada turned his aircraft directly toward Lindbergh who was just approaching the combat area. Lindbergh fired in a defensive reaction brought on by Shimada’s apparent head-on ramming attack. Hit by cannon and machine gun fire, the "Sonia’s" propeller visibly slowed, but Shimada held his course. Lindbergh pulled up at the last moment to avoid collision as the damaged "Sonia" went into a steep dive, hit the ocean and sank. Lindbergh’s wingman, ace Joseph E. "Fishkiller" Miller, Jr., had also scored hits on the "Sonia" after it had begun its fatal dive, but Miller was certain the kill credit was Lindbergh’s. The unofficial kill was not entered in the 475th’s war record. On 12 August 1944 Lindbergh left Hollandia to return to the United States.

Charles MacDonald

The seventh-ranking American ace, Charles H. MacDonald, flew a Lightning against the Japanese, scoring 27 kills in his famous aircraft, the Putt Putt Maru.

Robin Olds

Main article: Robin Olds

Robin Olds was the last P-38 ace in the Eighth Air Force and the last in the ETO. Flying a P-38J, he downed five German fighters on two separate missions over France and Germany. He subsequently transitioned to P-51s to make seven more kills. After World War II, he flew F-4 Phantom IIs in Vietnam, ending his career as brigadier general with 16 kills.

Clay Tice

A P-38 piloted by Clay Tice was the first American aircraft to land in Japan after VJ-Day, when he and his wingman set down on Nitagahara because his wingman was low on fuel.

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Noted aviation pioneer and writer Antoine de Saint-Exupéry vanished in a F-5B-1-LO, 42-68223, c/n 2734, of Groupe de Chasse II/33, out of Borgo-Porreta, Bastia, Corsica, a reconnaissance variant of the P-38, while on a flight over the Mediterranean, from Corsica to mainland France, on 31 July 1944. His health, both physical and mental (he was said to be intermittently subject to depression), had been deteriorating and there had been talk of taking him off flight status. There have been suggestions (although no proof to date) that this was a suicide rather than an aircraft failure or combat loss. In 2000, a French scuba diver found the wreckage of a Lightning in the Mediterranean off the coast of Marseille, and it was confirmed in April 2004 as Saint-Exupéry’s F-5B. No evidence of air combat was found. In March 2008, a former Luftwaffe pilot, Horst Rippert from Jagdgruppe 200, claimed to have shot down Saint-Exupéry.

Adrian Warburton

The RAF’s legendary photo-recon "ace", Wing Commander Adrian Warburton DSO DFC, was the pilot of a Lockheed P-38 borrowed from the USAAF that took off on 12 April 1944 to photograph targets in Germany. W/C Warburton failed to arrive at the rendezvous point and was never seen again. In 2003, his remains were recovered in Germany from his wrecked USAAF P-38 Lightning.

China.
injection mold china
Image by John Levanen
The Vickers Communications Dept. was filming at a plastics injection molding plant in Zhejiang. (1984.)
We were recording Vickers products and applications.
After a full day of shooting our hosts took us to a late lunch,about 3:00PM.
What a lunch! We ate well and then started toasting with plum wine.We toasted China, the United States, and President Ronald Reagan.
We then got on a train for a three hour ride back to Shanghai.(That is a another story.)
What a day! I think we strengthened PRC-American relatons.(At least I hope so.)
Photo by Staff Photographer Don Pas.
(I copied an old 5X7 print with my Nikon Coolpix. Pretty cool.)

China Plastic Mold Factory Meets the Demands of Injection Molding Service Providers

Plastic mould makers normally tie up with plastic mold manufacturer for their want of molds. A mold manufacturer which can design and supply other type of mold is the natural option of that molders for a diverse motives.

A mold manufacturer may possibly be referred to as upon to make and commence manufacture inside extremely quick time. As soon as, a usual tie up with a trustworthy plastic Commodity Mould maker guarantees him that he can keep the delivery deadline and retain his customers. Quite typically a mold maker may well arranged spec sheets nevertheless will disappear it to the R&ampD. the style teams of this mold manufacturer to develop on it from a variety of viewpoints. In that circumstances a plastic mold maker with all such sophisticated R&ampD, style and created facilities does establish to be of excellent assist since he will run reproduction software and advance mold in terms of expense, manufacturing speed and life remembering the numbers to be made. China has some best, decently integrated and higher technologies Plastic Mould Maker China, match for preparing and generating to demanding determinations and delivering products inside period and inside your spending budget. A partnership with them assists decays lower costs and expand advantage.

Despite the fact that you have run over a variety of types of plastic Commodity Mould alternatives, but there are typically two important kinds of molding method, utilized. These two options are injection as properly as blow molding solutions. Forever make it a point to get assitance of reliable specialists, as you need the specialist assist for this segment. With out ideal understanding, you will not have the capacity to pour the liquid components in the right way. Accordingly, verify the qualifications of the assembling units, before taking their help.

The manufacturing procedure where the plastic is inserted into molds to make components is recognized as plastic injection molding. First, the plastic is heated and blended in a container and constrained into a mould hollow. After that, left mixture to cool and harden to finish the procedures. A quality plastic injection moulding manufacturing need to have excellent knowledge and top quality so verify you take a gander at a couple of organizations when picking so you are decently educated and can cautiously choose the organization that will supply for you the very best esteem for cash.

The company should adhere to stringent high quality checks to make particular against problems. If there are such fault, it need to be the organization’s responsibility to repair them, as effectively as making new components. There are lots of distinct types of imperfection which must be investigated for including jetting, polymer degradation, short shot, weld/knit lines, sink marks, splay marks and also stringiness, voids, warping/twisting, blistering, burn marks/dieseling, colour streaks, de-lamination, flash/burrs, embedded contaminates and flow marks.

A Plastic Mould Maker China should be capable to prove reliability as nicely as dependability. A organization which has been in company for lengthy occasions have to have such credentials. The organization must be capable to meet robust dealines and should also utilize ‘green’ manufacturing procedure as properly as have all the vital licenses.

This write-up is written by Jacob Williams on behalf of HQMOULD. His understanding in plastic moulding sector has seen him contribute to and write a number of articles on subjects like plastic mould factory, Commodity Mould, Plastic Injection Moulding Manufacturers, Pipe Fitting Mould and Plastic Mould Maker China and so forth.
Cool China Frequent Plastic Mold Manufacturer pictures

Cool China Frequent Plastic Mold Manufacturer pictures

Some cool china frequent plastic mold manufacturer pictures:

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Hawker Hurricane Mk. IIC, with Northrop P-61C Black Widow, B-29 Superfortress “Enola Gay”, and SR-71 Blackbird in the background
china common plastic mold manufacturer
Image by Chris Devers
See a lot more photographs of this, and the Wikipedia write-up.

Particulars, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Steven F. Udvar-Hazy | Hawker Hurricane Mk. IIC:

Hawker Chief Designer Sydney Camm’s Hurricane ranks with the most crucial aircraft styles in military aviation history. Designed in the late 1930s, when monoplanes had been regarded as unstable and too radical to be productive, the Hurricane was the very first British monoplane fighter and the very first British fighter to exceed 483 kilometers (300 miles) per hour in level flight. Hurricane pilots fought the Luftwaffe and helped win the Battle of Britain in the summer of 1940.

This Mark IIC was built at the Langley factory, close to what is now Heathrow Airport, early in 1944. It served as a coaching aircraft in the course of the Planet War II in the Royal Air Force’s 41 OTU.

Donated by the Royal Air Force Museum

Manufacturer:
Hawker Aircraft Ltd.

Date:
1944

Nation of Origin:
United Kingdom

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 12.2 m (40 ft)
Length: 9.eight m (32 ft three in)
Height: 4 m (13 ft)
Weight, empty: two,624 kg (five,785 lb)
Weight, gross: 3,951 kg (eight,710 lb)
Top speed:538 km/h (334 mph)
Engine:Rolls-Royce Merlin XX, liquid-cooled in-line V, 1,300 hp
Armament:4 20 mm Hispano cannons
Ordnance:two 250-lb or two 500-lb bombs or eight three-in rockets

Materials:
Fuselage: Steel tube with aircraft spruce types and fabric, aluminum cowling
Wings: Stressed Skin Aluminum
Horizontal Stablizer: Pressure Skin aluminum
Rudder: fabric covered aluminum
Control Surfaces: fabric covered aluminum

Physical Description:
Hawker Hurricane Mk. IIC single seat, low wing monoplane ground attack fighter enclosed cockpit steel tube fuselage with aircraft spruce types and fabric, aluminum cowling, stressed skin aluminum wings and horizontal stablizer, fabric covered aluminum rudder and manage surfaces grey green camoflage prime surface paint scheme with dove grey underside red and blue national roundel on upper wing surface and red, white, and blue roundel decrease wing surface red, white, blue, and yellow roundel fuselage sides red, white and blue tail flash Rolls-Royce Merlin XX, liquid cooled V-12, 1,280 horsepower engine Armament, 4: 20mm Hispano cannons.

• • • • •

See more images of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum: Steven F. Udvar-Hazy | Northrop P-61C Black Widow:

The P-61 Black Widow was the very first U.S. aircraft designed to find and destroy enemy aircraft at evening and in undesirable weather, a feat made attainable by the use of on-board radar. The prototype very first flew in 1942. P-61 combat operations began just right after D-Day, June six, 1944, when Black Widows flew deep into German airspace, bombing and strafing trains and road targeted traffic. Operations in the Pacific began at about the exact same time. By the end of Planet War II, Black Widows had seen combat in every theater and had destroyed 127 enemy aircraft and 18 German V-1 buzz bombs.

The Museum’s Black Widow, a P-61C-1-NO, was delivered to the Army Air Forces in July 1945. It participated in cold-weather tests, higher-altitude drop tests, and in the National Thunderstorm Project, for which the top turret was removed to make area for thunderstorm monitoring equipment.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Northrop Aircraft Inc.

Date:
1943

Nation of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
General: 450 x 1500cm, 10637kg, 2000cm (14ft 9 three/16in. x 49ft 2 9/16in., 23450.3lb., 65ft 7 3/8in.)

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Boeing B-29 Superfortress &quotEnola Gay&quot:

Boeing’s B-29 Superfortress was the most sophisticated propeller-driven bomber of Planet War II and the 1st bomber to residence its crew in pressurized compartments. Although developed to fight in the European theater, the B-29 discovered its niche on the other side of the globe. In the Pacific, B-29s delivered a variety of aerial weapons: traditional bombs, incendiary bombs, mines, and two nuclear weapons.

On August 6, 1945, this Martin-constructed B-29-45-MO dropped the first atomic weapon utilised in combat on Hiroshima, Japan. 3 days later, Bockscar (on show at the U.S. Air Force Museum close to Dayton, Ohio) dropped a second atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan. Enola Gay flew as the advance weather reconnaissance aircraft that day. A third B-29, The Wonderful Artiste, flew as an observation aircraft on both missions.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Boeing Aircraft Co.
Martin Co., Omaha, Nebr.

Date:
1945

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
General: 900 x 3020cm, 32580kg, 4300cm (29ft 6 five/16in. x 99ft 1in., 71825.9lb., 141ft 15/16in.)

Components:
Polished general aluminum finish

Physical Description:
Four-engine heavy bomber with semi-monoqoque fuselage and high-aspect ratio wings. Polished aluminum finish all round, regular late-Globe War II Army Air Forces insignia on wings and aft fuselage and serial quantity on vertical fin 509th Composite Group markings painted in black &quotEnola Gay&quot in black, block letters on reduced left nose.

• • • • •

See far more photographs of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Specifics, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird:

No reconnaissance aircraft in history has operated globally in a lot more hostile airspace or with such total impunity than the SR-71, the world’s quickest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird’s performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments for the duration of the Cold War.

This Blackbird accrued about 2,800 hours of flight time for the duration of 24 years of active service with the U.S. Air Force. On its last flight, March 6, 1990, Lt. Col. Ed Yielding and Lt. Col. Joseph Vida set a speed record by flying from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging 3,418 kilometers (two,124 miles) per hour. At the flight’s conclusion, they landed at Washington-Dulles International Airport and turned the airplane more than to the Smithsonian.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Corporation

Designer:
Clarence L. &quotKelly&quot Johnson

Date:
1964

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 18ft five 15/16in. x 55ft 7in. x 107ft 5in., 169998.5lb. (5.638m x 16.942m x 32.741m, 77110.8kg)
Other: 18ft five 15/16in. x 107ft 5in. x 55ft 7in. (five.638m x 32.741m x 16.942m)

Materials:
Titanium

Physical Description:
Twin-engine, two-seat, supersonic strategic reconnaissance aircraft airframe constructed largley of titanium and its alloys vertical tail fins are constructed of a composite (laminated plastic-type material) to decrease radar cross-section Pratt and Whitney J58 (JT11D-20B) turbojet engines feature massive inlet shock cones.

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Boeing B-29 Superfortress “Enola Gay”, with Lockheed P-38J-10-LO Lightning
china common plastic mold manufacturer
Image by Chris Devers
Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed P-38J-10-LO Lightning :

In the P-38 Lockheed engineer Clarence &quotKelly&quot Johnson and his team of designers produced one of the most profitable twin-engine fighters ever flown by any nation. From 1942 to 1945, U. S. Army Air Forces pilots flew P-38s over Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Pacific, and from the frozen Aleutian Islands to the sun-baked deserts of North Africa. Lightning pilots in the Pacific theater downed a lot more Japanese aircraft than pilots flying any other Allied warplane.

Maj. Richard I. Bong, America’s top fighter ace, flew this P-38J-ten-LO on April 16, 1945, at Wright Field, Ohio, to evaluate an experimental strategy of interconnecting the movement of the throttle and propeller manage levers. Even so, his correct engine exploded in flight ahead of he could conduct the experiment.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Business

Date:
1943

Nation of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
All round: 390 x 1170cm, 6345kg, 1580cm (12ft 9 9/16in. x 38ft four 5/8in., 13988.2lb., 51ft 10 1/16in.)

Supplies:
All-metal

Physical Description:
Twin-tail boom and twin-engine fighter tricycle landing gear.

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Boeing B-29 Superfortress &quotEnola Gay&quot:

Boeing’s B-29 Superfortress was the most sophisticated propeller-driven bomber of World War II and the first bomber to property its crew in pressurized compartments. Although developed to fight in the European theater, the B-29 discovered its niche on the other side of the globe. In the Pacific, B-29s delivered a selection of aerial weapons: standard bombs, incendiary bombs, mines, and two nuclear weapons.

On August 6, 1945, this Martin-built B-29-45-MO dropped the initial atomic weapon utilized in combat on Hiroshima, Japan. 3 days later, Bockscar (on show at the U.S. Air Force Museum near Dayton, Ohio) dropped a second atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan. Enola Gay flew as the advance weather reconnaissance aircraft that day. A third B-29, The Fantastic Artiste, flew as an observation aircraft on both missions.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Boeing Aircraft Co.
Martin Co., Omaha, Nebr.

Date:
1945

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
General: 900 x 3020cm, 32580kg, 4300cm (29ft 6 5/16in. x 99ft 1in., 71825.9lb., 141ft 15/16in.)

Components:
Polished general aluminum finish

Physical Description:
4-engine heavy bomber with semi-monoqoque fuselage and high-aspect ratio wings. Polished aluminum finish general, regular late-Planet War II Army Air Forces insignia on wings and aft fuselage and serial number on vertical fin 509th Composite Group markings painted in black &quotEnola Gay&quot in black, block letters on lower left nose.

China Auto Mold: Rise in the field of Technologies

China Auto Mold: Rise in the field of Technologies

Due to the advancement in manufacturing field, the utilization of the steel copper alloy has reached almost 100 percent. And due to which the china auto molding business has changed the manufacturing method from rough shaping of the material to the net shaping processing so that it gains a high efficiency delivering the material at low cost and light weight. And the use of net shape manufacturing technique helped the current china auto mold industries to save energy and materials so that it could offer effective sliding bearing accessories which could additional support in the development of china’s automotive industry.

China has been gaining higher popularity considering that past few decades in it automobile sector. Although, some basic parts like axes guide, thrust washers, bearing bush and automobile mold parts and their standards are primarily dependent on imports that can bring the favorable golden possibilities and the great challenges to the other Chinese primarily based producers and china auto mold supplier industries. Computer software used by them: Unigraphics, Pro-E, Solidworks, Moldflow. They have the high precision tooling machine with the operating group with project division, top quality department and processing department devoted in the complete order processing handle. China auto mold has their personal department for project analysis and new item development.
According to Liu Depu, the Secretary-General of Shanghai Die &amp Mould Market Association, the Chinese mould business will present ten trends in the future.

1.The 1st one particular is that mould merchandise are increasingly larger.
2.The second trend is that the precision of the mold will be greater.
three.The third trend is that the multi-functional mould complex will be additional created.
four.Fourthly, the proportion of hot runner Molds are progressively enhanced.
5.Fifthly, some new moulds that adapt to high-pressure injection and molding will be created with the continuous improvement of plastic molding process.
six.The sixth a single is that the application of standard components will be much more extensive.
7.Seventhly, the prospect for fast Economic molds are extremely broad. Nowadays is the era of multiple varieties of small batch production.
8.Eighthly, the ratio of die-casting molds will continue to improve with the development of automobiles and electrical merchandise.
9.The ninth 1 is that the proportion of plastic molds will continue to enhance.
10.The tenth is that the technical content material of mould products will continue to be increased.

Presently, the china auto mold supplier industries have left behind all the conventional bi-metal bearing manufacturing technology as it will have the very best independent intellectual property of china by adopting the a lot more power and material saving technologies. The unique china auto mold supplier industry utilizes the least investment and usage of equipments. Hence, it is serving as an exceptional and grand opportunity to be grabbed for development.

Ravi Kumar is an skilled writer and blogger. Hello Friends, I have written my view on the China Auto Mold sector. Have a look. For much more details pay a visit to our web site. Follow at twitter(@automotivemould) for regular updates.